Drosera ramellosa
ramellosa

Drosera ramellosa

Drosera ramellosa is a fan leaved tuberous sundew endemic to Western Australia. The species has 1-3 erect stems that arise from a basal rosette. The leaves on the erect stem are alternating and have short petioles. Generally, the colour is yellow-green although sometimes it is blushed with red or orange. The inflorescence emerges directly from the basal rosette and terminates close to the ground.

The species grows in winter wet soils particularly in the drainage basins of granite outcrops or on banks of small lakes. It is widespread, occurring from the west of the Nullarbor Plain, along the south coast and up the west coast past Geraldton.

Drosera ramellosa is closely related to other members of the subgenus Stolonifera and shares many common characteristics such as a fleshy inflorescence, fan-shaped leaves and white flowers. It is most similar to Drosera platypoda, which also has erect stems and alternating leaves. D. ramellosa is distinguished by its inflorescence, which emerges directly from the basal rosette (those of D. platypoda emerge at the end of the leaved stems).

Drosera ramellosa growing on a granite outcrop in the Wheatbelt east of the Darling Scarp. Note the erect stem and alternating leaves.
Note that the (spent) flower inflorescences emerge directly from the basal rosette and are borne low to the ground.
Drosera ramellosa growing on a granite outcrop in the Wheatbelt east of the Darling Scarp.
Drosera ramellosa growing on a granite outcrop in the Wheatbelt east of the Darling Scarp. The plants occupied a large depression on a flat section of the rock, where water accumulates and supports a moss apron.
Drosera ramellosa near Eneabba. Note that the (spent) flower inflorescences emerge directly from the basal rosette and are borne low to the ground.
Drosera ramellosa near Eneabba. The plants grew in a lush meadow situated on the edge of an inland lake.
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