Drosera rosulata

Drosera rosulata

Drosera rosulata is a rosetted tuberous species endemic to Western Australia. The species is somewhat morphologicaly variable, especially in size, but is identified by the depressed central vein of its leaves. These leaves appear if they have been creased along its length and are obovate in shape. The flowers are white and borne singly on the peduncle, emerging at the start of the growing season.

The species grows along the western coastal plain, the Darling Scarp and the foothills east of the scarp. It is associated with swamp flats, watersheds and the drainage fields of granite outcrops, where it grows in sandy loam.

Drosera rosulata often grows alongside other rosetted species throughout its range. In the Darling Scarp, it often grows alongside Drosera bulbosa, but seems to have a slight preference for loam (over the moss that D. bulbosa inhabits). It is primarily distinguished by its depressed central vein. Drosera orbiculata also shares this feature but has orbicular leaves.

Large form of Drosera rosulata in Bunbury. These plants are a bit etiolated.
Drosera rosulata near Bridgetown. The plants grew alongside a swamp. Note the obovate lamina shape, which appear as if they have been folded along the middle.
Drosera rosulata in the Perth Hills near the Brookton Highway
Drosera rosulata near the Albany Highway. Plants in this locale are generally small.
D. rosulata near the Albany Highway. The species sometimes grows more elongated leaves similar to D. bulbosa, but is distinguished by the sunken central vein.
D. rosulata in the Avon Hills
An example of a swamp flat in the Perth Hills near the Albany Highway. The soil is clayey and sandy.
Granite outcrop habitat in the Perth Hills. These drainage fields are formed around flatter granite surfaces.
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