Species spotlight: Drosera huegelii
huegelii

Species spotlight: Drosera huegelii

Drosera huegelii is one of my favourite species of erect tuberous sundew. Its thin stems are adorned with dangling jellyfish-like leaves, which I find to be quite charming. There are two main form of the plant which are widely distributed along the south west coast of Western Australia. The typical form of plant grows up to half a meter long and scrambles amongst shrubs to remain upright. A dwarf form referred to as the ‘phillmanniana’ variety is restricted to the high peaks of the Stirling Range and select granite outcrops in the South West region. This tiny plant grows only a few centimeters tall but retains a proportionally oversized flower.

It’s dangling, alternating leaves distinguish it from other erect species. In some cases, Drosera macrantha can be somewhat similar, in which case Drosera huegelli can be separated by its glabrous surfaces.

Drosera huegelii var huegelii growing in the Fitzgerald River National Park. This large plant grows up to 50 cm tall and is widely distributed along the south west coast of Western Australia. Its foliage can be distinguished from the somewhat similar D macrantha by its glabrous nature.
Drosera huegelii var phillmanniana on the high slopes of the Stirling Range. This diminutive variety grows only on the peaks of the Stirling Range and select granite outcrops of the South West region. This plant in the Stirling Range had pink flowers. The sepals of the species are feathered.
Drosera huegelii var phillmanniana in the high slopes of the Stirling Range. This diminutive variety grows only on the peaks of the Stirling Range and select granite outcrops of the South West region. The proportionally over-sized blooms are one of my favourite aspects in this variety.
Drosera huegelii var phillmanniana on the summit of Bluff Knoll. This diminutive variety grows only on the peaks of the Stirling Range and select granite outcrops of the South West region. The plants in the summit plateau are especially stunted by the harsh conditions and snow that occasionally falls well into spring.
Drosera huegelii var phillmanniana growing on a granite outcrop in the South West. Compared to the plants I saw in the Stirling Range, this population produced plans that were a relatively taller and more robust.
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