Drosera modesta

Drosera modesta

Drosera modesta is a scrambling tuberous species that grows in karri and jarrah forest mostly towards the south of WA. The species is recognisable by its wispy and delicate stature, as referenced in its specific epithet. The stem, which is covered with a sparse layer of glandular indumenta in the upper portions, is fairly flimsy and it requires surrounding bushes to prop itself up. The leaves are distinctly crescentic with a small lamina and particularly long upper arms. The plants are light green in colour. The species flowers only when fully mature and at any given site there are usually more juvenile plants, as a result of prolific asexual tuber production.

Drosera modesta often grows in association with shaded streams and rivulets. Such habitats include the moist forest floors in the deep karri understory of the south west, in mossy depressions on massive granite outcrops, on shaded cuts aside tracks and on the banks of small creeks. It grows throughout the Great Southern and South West regions. It is also present in the Darling Scarp closer to Perth, although there doesn’t seem to be a catalogued botanical record there.

Plants growing by a stream in the Perth Hills around 30 km SW of metro Perth. Note the glandular indumenta on the stem and the small crescentic lamina.
Small plants growing in leaf litter in heavily shaded karri forest. Young plants can be glabrous.
Young plants growing in moss on a large granite outcrop. Notice the Utricularia multifida sharing the same moist niche.
Plants growing under bushes on a large granite outcrop in the South West.
I’m pretty sure these are young plants still in the basal rosette stage. This rosette is completely absent in more advanced specimens. These were growing on a wet mossy face next to a waterfall in the Stirling Range.
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