Species spotlight: Drosera glanduligera
glanduligera

Species spotlight: Drosera glanduligera

Drosera glanduligera is a widespread sundew growing in the winter-cold plains of the southern Australian states and into Queensland. This annual species forms a small rosette of green leaves. It is especially known for its long snap tentacles, which extend from the edge of the leaf. When touched by an insect, the snap tentacle quickly reflexes and catapults the prey into the sticky center of the leaf. The species grows widely in a range of habitats but seems to be somewhat associated with shallow, full exposure niches such as mossy loam atop granite outcrops and gravelly fields.

Drosera glanduligera can be distinguished in the flowering phase by its orange flower and short, densely hirsute peduncle. It can be confused with Drosera burmannii in the rare locations where the two species overlap, in which case it is distinguished by its green coloration and strongly pitted oval shaped lamina (as opposed to the wedge shaped leaves of D. burmannii). It is also superficially similar to the rosette phase of Drosera hookeri but can be identified by its long snap tentacles and densely hairy petioles.

Drosera glanduligera growing in a mossy patch on a granite outcrop in the South West region of WA

Drosera glanduligera growing in a mossy patch on a granite outcrop in the South West region of WA
Drosera glanduligera growing en mass on the drainage field of a granite outcrop in the Wheatbelt region.
Drosera glanduligera in bloom. Note the orange flower and densely hairy scape
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